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This year will mark the twentieth annual Worldwide Ride to Work Day on Monday, June 20th. According to the U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Transportation, more than 80 million cars and light trucks are used for daily commuting on American roads, and about 200,000 motorcycles and scooters are a regular part of this mix. Commuting to work on your motorcycle can be stressful, especially if your commute involves riding in rush hour traffic or on the highway. With Monday quickly approaching, we feel it’s only appropriate to give you some useful motorcycle commuting tips.

1. Take what you need - When you are commuting to and from work only take the cargo that you need and try to leave other items, like shoes or work clothes, at the office. For items that you need to carry, such as a briefcase or laptop, a durable motorcycle backpack is one of the most versatile and practical ways of carrying cargo. Not just any backpack will do the trick though, and it’s important to note that backpacks specifically designed for motorcyclists differ in a few ways from ordinary luggage backpacks. For example, the Alpinestars MotoGP Charger Backpack has a laptop pocket and a waterproof zipper to ensure weather protection. Also, most motorcycle backpacks are specifically made with the commuter in mind.

2.  Be Prepared – It’s a good idea to be prepared for any unpredictable weather conditions by keeping rain gear either in a compartment in your motorcycle or in your motorcycle backpack. We recommend one-piece rain suits because they tend to be more compact than two-piece suits, and this is a huge space-saving advantage. Also, rain boot covers can easily be stored in a motorcycle backpack. These overboot covers are made of a waterproof material and can easily be slipped on over shoes and adjusted.

3. Time - Give yourself plenty of time to get to your destination. Just like driving a car, you may run into unforeseen or inconvenient scenarios like traffic jams or bad weather, which can cause frustration. Riding a motorcycle in bad weather may slow down your commute more than driving a car. By giving yourself some extra time you may not be as stressed if these unforeseen scenarios occur and you will still make it to work on time.

4. Rush Hour Traffic - Riding in slow traffic can be difficult and frustrating. By leaving plenty of room between you and the car in front of you, you will be able see more of the road, the environment in front of you, and the flow of traffic ahead. You may drive perfectly, but you can’t expect others to. Make room for others’ mistakes by leaving room for drivers to make a mistake or screw up. If someone does make a mistake, at least you will not be negatively affected.

We want to hear your commuting tips or stories. Are you planning on commuting to work on your motorcycle on Worldwide Ride to Work Day? Please drop us a comment below!

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5 Comments on this post

  1. thnku nice article and good suggestions

    Rain Suits / Reply
  2. I ride everyday that there is no snow on the ground. Many good tips in the original article. The most important point is keeping track of cars around you. Seems mornings going in to work most people are on autopilot and simply do not see you. Most of all – enjoy the ride, nothing beats a nice back road ride home to unwind from the day!

    Phil / Reply
  3. I ride EVERY day in all weather. Don’t own a car and don’t want one. Commuting on a bike is NOT “stressful” or “frustrating” It is a stress reliever and JOY!!!

    Ride Safe Ride Often. Wear your gear (all of it) and don’t be myopic.

    Zekad / Reply
  4. Get THERE in one piece (not “their”). Oops! Not enough coffee yet.

    BTW, practice your swerving and braking techniques regularly. Remember what you were taught in the MSF course about Search, Evaluate and Execute (you DID take the MSF course, didn’t you?). Follow the two second (at least) rule of following another vehicle. Scan the road ahead for anything. Parts come off cars and trucks all the time and land where you need to be. LOOK!

    John / Reply
  5. Keep a mental inventory of ALL the cagers and riders around you at all times. See them even if they don’t see you. Situational awareness is essential when riding, especially in heavy traffic. Always plan an escape route. Stay out of a cager’s blind spot. Keep your thumb on the horn button and use it liberally when necessary. Wear ALL the gear ALL the time! There’s no guarantee that a cager will pay any attention to their surroundings, so your brightly-colored clothing, extra lighting, loud pipes or horn will likely be ineffective at prying their attention away from the sports section, GPS, cell phone call, text message, hot girl in the convertible next to them, etc. We have to pay more attention to them than they pay attention to us! Ride safe. Get their in one piece!

    John / Reply

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